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true story - good one too - de Horia D la: 20/04/2005 21:06:57
(la: Trancaneala Aristocrata "2")
At the 1994 annual awards dinner given for Forensic Science, AAFS

President Dr. Don Harper Mills astounded his audience with the
legal complications of a bizarre death.

Here is the story:

On March 23, 1994 the medical examiner viewed the body of Ronald
Opus and concluded that he died from a shotgun wound to the
head. Mr. Opus had jumped from the top of a ten-story building
intending to commit suicide. He left a note to the effect
indicating his despondency.

As he fell past the ninth floor his life was interrupted by a
shotgun blast passing through a window, which killed him
instantly.

Neither the shooter nor the deceased was aware that a safety net
had been installed just below the eighth floor level to protect
some building workers and that Ronald Opus would not have been
able to complete his suicide the way he had planned.

"Ordinarily," Dr Mills continued, "Someone who sets out to commit
suicide and ultimately succeeds, even though the mechanism might
not be what he intended, is still defined as committing
suicide." That Mr. Opus was shot on the way to certain death,
but probably would not have been successful because of the safety
net, caused the medical examiner to feel that he had a homicide on
his hands.

In the room on the ninth floor, where the shotgun blast
emanated, was occupied by an elderly man and his wife. They were
arguing vigorously and he was threatening her with a shotgun. The
man was so upset that when he pulled the trigger he completely missed
his wife and the pellets went through the window striking Mr. Opus.

When one intends to kill subject 'A' but kills subject 'B' in
the attempt, one is guilty of the murder of subject 'B'.

When confronted with the murder charge the old man and his wife
were both adamant and both said that they thought the shotgun
was not loaded. The old man said it was a long-standing habit to
threaten his wife with the unloaded shotgun. He had no intention
to murder her.

Therefore the killing of Mr. Opus appeared to be an accident;
that is, assuming the gun had been accidentally loaded.

The continuing investigation turned up a witness who saw the old
couple's son loading the shotgun about six weeks prior to the
fatal accident.

It transpired that the old lady had cut off her son's financial
support and the son, knowing the propensity of his father to use
the shotgun threateningly, loaded the gun with the expectation
that his father would shoot his mother.

Since the loader of the gun was aware of this, he was guilty of
the murder even though he didn't actually pull the trigger. The
case now becomes one of murder on the part of the son for the
death of Ronald Opus.

Now comes the exquisite twist.

Further investigation revealed that the son was, in fact, Ronald
Opus. He had become increasingly despondent over the failure of
his attempt to engineer his mother's murder. This led him to
jump off the ten-story building on March 23rd, only to be killed
by a shotgun blast passing through the ninth story window. The son
had actually murdered himself so the medical examiner closed the
case as a suicide.

A true story from Associated Press, Reported by Kurt Westervelt
oki don - de Belle la: 01/06/2005 15:42:43
(la: Trancaneala Aristocrata "3")
ia notite (nu-ti traduc ca stiu ca n-ai probleme cu engleza)

Chewy Flour Tortillas

These tortillas have real body and taste; they are perfect for gorditas, fajitas and eating out of hand.

2 C All-purpose flour
1-½ t Baking powder
1 t Salt
2 t Vegetable oil
¾ C Lukewarm milk (2% is fine)
Stir together the flour and baking powder in a large mixing bowl. Add the salt and vegetable oil to the lukewarm milk and whisk briefly to incorporate. Gradually add the milk to the flour, and work the mixture into a dough. It will be sticky.

Turn the dough out onto a surface dusted with flour and knead vigorously for about 2 minutes (fold and press, fold and press). The kneading will take care of the stickiness. Return the dough to the bowl, cover it with a damp cloth, and let it rest for 15 minutes. (This dough will not rise, but it needs a rest.)

Divide your dough into 8 balls of equal size, cover them, and let them rest again for about 20 minutes. Avoid letting them touch, if you don't want them to stick together.
Dust your work surface with flour. Working one at a time, remove each piece of dough and pat it into a 5-inch circle. With a rolling pin, roll out the tortilla, working from the center out, until you have a 7- or 8-inch tortilla a little less than ¼-inch thick. Transfer the tortilla to a hot, dry skillet or griddle. It will begin to blister. Let it cook for 30 seconds, turn it, and let the other side cook for 30 seconds. Remove the tortilla, place it in a napkin-lined basket and cover with aluminum foil. Repeat for the remaining tortillas.

Although flour tortillas, like corn tortillas, are best if eaten right after they are made, these tortillas will freeze well. Wrap them tightly in plastic, and they will keep, frozen, for several weeks. To serve tortillas that have been frozen, let them thaw and come to room temperature, then wrap them in aluminum foil and heat them in a warm oven. Microwaving tends to toughen them.

Here are some tips as to technique:

Do not use bread flour. You want flour with a low gluten content.
You don't want to over-flour your work surface, but you don't want your rolled-out tortilla sticking to it either. I found that the dough adhered less to an unvarnished wood surface (like an old cutting board) than any other surface I tried.
A flat dough scraper, known in baking parlance as a "bench knife", is very efficient in removing the rolled-out tortilla from the work surface.
When rolling out tortillas, dust your rolling pin with flour, and don't be afraid to apply pressure. Flour tortilla dough is pretty sturdy; but not to the point of rerolling. You don't want tough tortillas.
Once you get a rhythm going, you can roll out a tortilla, put it on to cook and, while it cooks, roll out your next tortilla. Seems like an arduous process but, with this method, I could produce 8 tortillas in about 10 action-packed minutes. Be sure to rewrap your fresh tortillas each time you add another to the stack.

If you like, you can substitute one cup of whole wheat flour for one cup of the all-purpose flour.

My personal preference is for plain tortillas but, if desired, you can spice up this recipe by adding

A tablespoon of chopped fresh herbs (like oregano or rosemary)
A teaspoon or so of dried herbs
Freshly ground black pepper
A tablespoon of minced jalapeños
A little garlic powder (or substitute garlic salt for the salt)
If you choose to experiment with seasonings, mix dry spices with the flour mixture and fresh or "wet" seasonings with the milk.


mai multe detalii poti gasi aici
http://www.texascooking.com/features/sept98flourtortillas.htm

uite inca o reteta
http://www.dianaskitchen.com/page/bread/tortilla.htm

#52639 (raspuns la: #52638) comenteaza . modifica . semnaleaza adminului



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